Perl Weekly Challenge 12 – Euclid Numbers

This week’s Perl Weekly Challenge, problem 1, reads:

The numbers formed by adding one to the products of the smallest primes are called the Euclid Numbers (see wiki). Write a script that finds the smallest Euclid Number that is not prime. This challenge was proposed by Laurent Rosenfeld.

The first Euclid numbers are 3, 7, and 31.   These are computed as follows:

We’ll take the first three prime numbers – 2, 3, and 5.

The corresponding Euclid number is the prime number multiplied by all the smaller prime numbers, with 1 added to it.

So the first one, 3, is just 2 (nothing to multiply it against) plus 1.

The second one is 3 * 2 plus 1, or 7.

The third one is 5 * 3 *2 + 1, which is 31.

How do you do this in code? Continue reading

Converting Decimal to Roman Numbers in Perl 6

This week’s (week 10) Perl Request Challenge, challenge 1, was:

Write a script to encode/decode Roman numerals. For example, given Roman numeral CCXLVI, it should return 246. Similarly, for decimal number 39, it should return XXXIX. Checkout wikipedia page for more informaiton.

For this blog, I’m going to talk about converting a decimal to a Roman numeral.

To start with, I read the Wikipedia page referenced in the challenge, and realized there were several different systems for writing Roman numerals – it wasn’t as standardized as I thought! That said, I stuck with the style used in the description of the challenge, specifically “subtractive” notation.  Essentially, the symbols are written from the largest value to the smallest value, left to right, with no more than 3 of any symbol used.  When four of a symbol would normally be used (for instance, IIII to mean 4), instead it would be written as IV, meaning one less than 4 (you see this because the smaller number is before the bigger number).

So that’s what I’ll talk about below – the part of the code that converts an integer to a Roman number.

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Open Up Your Open Source Module – Part 3: CODE_OF_CONDUCT File

This is Part 3 of a 5 part series.  Links to other parts (as they become available) are below.

We’ve previously talked about adding the CONTRIBUTING and TODO files, so now we’ll get to the post I’ve been dreading: the CODE_OF_CONDUCT file. I believe strongly in the value of codes of conduct, and think every project should have one.

So, why would I dread it?

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Open Up Your Open Source Module – Part 2: TODO File

This is Part 2 of a 5 part series.  Links to other parts (as they become available) are below.

So, you’ve added a CONTRIBUTING file to your module (in part 1).  That’s great! Now people know the ground rules for contributing to your module.  But there is another thing you can do to encourage the contributions you want: Simply tell the potential developer what changes you might appreciate.

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Open Up Your Open Source Module – Part 1: CONTRIBUTING File

You’ve written something awesome! You want to release it as open source software into the world.  And, you hope other people will want to polish the rough edges, oil the squeaking hinge, and translate the help text into Klingon. Assuming that your module is interesting to people, how do you help them help you? I’ll give examples of how to do this in the context of Perl 5 modules, but they’ll work in other languages, too.

I talked about this in a lightning talk @ The Perl Conference 2018

But I also thought I could expand and organize my thoughts a bit better, so for the textually inclined, read on!

This is part one of a five part series.  I’ll link them all here when they are up.

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